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Snowdonia, Llyn Peninsula, Dovey Estuary, Slate Mines and more....

Caernarfon Castle

North Wales as it is now called was originally know until 1283 as the Kingdom of Gwynedd.

The area is steeped in history and has three splendid castles, all well worth a visit.

Caernarfon Castle originally a motte and bailey construction was replaced with the current stone structure in around the 1280's. If the castle's sheer scale does not impress you then its architectural polygonal towers built one upon another should.

Conwy Castle

Conwy Castle built between 1283 and 1289 is another giant of a castle, built on a rock promontory overlooking and guarding the River Conwy. It is another splendid example of Edwardian Gothic Architecture.

Penrhyn Castle

Penrhyn Castle on the other hand was originally a fortified Manor House. Its current guise was created during the early 1800's to designs by Thomas Hopper. A spiral staircase and vaulted basement from the original Manor House can still be seen.

Many small towns and villages show testament to their humble origins, from small coastal fishing towns, slate mining villages and agricultural communities, North Wales has them all. You could also discover the town with probably the most famous and definitely the longest Welsh name in history - Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch.

Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwll-llantysiliogogogoch


Snowdon Mountain

Having suffered from a very turbulent past, North Wales is now a very pleasant part of the country to visit.

Snowdonia train

The Snowdonia National Park spans two of North Wales' counties, namely Gwynedd and Conwy and is home to the highest mountain in Wales - Snowdon. The park is classed as an area of outstanding natural beauty and is full of hidden valleys, hills, rivers and moorlands just waiting to be discovered.

If walking to the summit of Snowdon sounds like a step to far, you could just sit back and take in the scenery aboard the Snowdon Mountain Railway, which winds its way up the mountain from Llanberis Station.
Pick a sunny day and you will be rewarded with huge views across the whole of Wales, you may even be able to see the Preseli Hills in Pembrokeshire if the conditions are right.

Dyfi Estuary in North Wales

Dovey (Dyfi) Estuary. Sharing the same watershed as the River Dee and the Severn, the Dovey flows south-westwards down the sea at Aberdovey. It passes through some lovely countryside and runs parallel with the A470 for much of its length.

The River is well known for its Salmon and migratory Sea Trout fishing. Higher reaches of the Dovey were once well renowned mining areas, with lead and slate being extracted for many years.



Pwllheli on the Llyn Peninsular

To the north west of North Wales is the Llyn Peninsula, a large headland once used by pilgrims on their way to Bardsey Island.

The headland has many small coves and hidden fishing villages dotted about. Formed mostly from volcanic rock the headland can be likened to the south west coast of Ireland, although the local accents are quite different.

Bardsey Island, situated some 2 miles off the western most point of the Llyn Peninsula, is now famous as a nesting place for Manx shearwaters and choughs. It is one of the best places in North Wales for seeing seals and dolphins.


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